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Not using tits and ass to sell music & doing it better : Africa VS West (Jains Makiba) By Anthony

Updated: Aug 19, 2023

This is a song that is proving to have the staying power that keeps on giving in multi genres that also uses the music and video medium to harness a positive message to raise awareness toward unjust politics while promoting culture through the power of music, and keeping your clothes on at the same time.

'Makeba' has been widely heard on Instagram reels, and it serves as an example of how the power of music can be used for more than just showing off body parts and selling records.

Throughout my life I've had a passionate interest in the impact that the music industry has on different cultures and societies, which has led to me traveling to many countries around the world, I recall seeing the stark contrast between each culture's preference for music, and in 2016 when this track was originally released, I immediately drawn to its catchy beat. Now we have a new appreciation for its meaning and message, and its video emphasizes just what different cultures put out and consider entertaining. That varies from place to place.

We are utterly desensitized and fail to recognize the harmful impact

It's no surprise that nowadays, following the state of music in the western world, young people are exposed to a lot of garbage and have become desensitized to it. It has reached a point where we've grown numb to the fact that mainstream music is mostly about exploiting women by objectifying them in videos to sell records.

In the West, female artists are propagating this idea that women are only valuable as objects for sex.


Daughters and other girls are being pressured to fit into this narrow, unhealthy standard of sexuality. This type of messaging is damaging - one study published by the American Psychological Society in 2007 concluded that virtually all media forms studied showed ample evidence of sexualization of women. Subsequent studies also show that women are portrayed sexually far more than men.

Exposure to sexualised images increases anxiety and shame in women, linked to eating disorders, low self-esteem, depression and unhealthy sexuality. Boys are exposed to the

message that girls exist for them; girls learn to value

attractiveness over other qualities. Boys may sexually harass females and have inappropriate expectations of them.


Makiba hit has more to it than a catchy tune

So with this song and it's rebirth through Instagram and tick tock, the video has yet again heightened not only my love and passion for the song but it also shined once again on a different culture and how they see fit as a great video about the music the place the message and the culture.


Makeba going viral all over again gives us the opportunity to revisit the song, its meaning, the artist and what it stands for. A “Can I get a ooh wee?” song began trending out of nowhere last weekend on Instagram Reels. The catchy song from 2015 resurfacing in mid-2023 is a reminder of the power of social media as the song went viral in no time. Over 2.7 million Reels have already been made.

Jain's song "Makeba" honors legendary South African singer and civil rights activist Miriam Makeba. With its catchy melodies, energetic beats, and blend of pop, reggae, and traditional African rhythms, it became an international hit

and an anthem for unity and activism. The video celebrates Makeba's spirit and resilience as she used her music to fight against the apartheid in South Africa. It encourages listeners to stand up for their beliefs and make a positive change.

The lyrics of the song give light to finding inner strength and standing up for one’s beliefs. They inspire individuals to take action towards making positive changes in their communities, urging them to come together to make a difference. The incorporation of Afro-pop music in Makeba is a celebration of Africa's rich cultural heritage. It showcases the beauty and vibrancy of African music, reminding the world of its ability to uplift and inspire people from all walks of life.

Makeba fearlessly used her singing performances to speak out against apartheid in South Africa. She gained international acclaim and advocated for equality and justice, leading to her exile in 1960. Throughout her life in exile, she continued to fight injustices and promote African music and culture.


Makeba was an iconic figure, addressing the UN and collaborating with other activists to raise awareness about the cause. Her legacy reminds us of the power of music and of using our voices for change. This is Jains story of her story showing us that Music is not only one of the most powerful tools we have in our arsenal to voice a message , but also when used to proper good will resonate much further and the impact will stand the test of time and have a positive impact.

Is it House or Mainstream?

Having experience in radio broadcasting on-air and working as a Music Programmer/Director, I can identify tunes with keynotes, bridges, and hooks that will resonate.

Each genre fits into its own category, but sometimes an artist or team come with something extra that combines more than one style and component. It's like a perfect storm when you find a track that is good enough to be mainstream yet contains unique qualities of underground house music. Makeba is one of these songs; it has enough quality to appeal to both mainstream and underground audiences.

Although a not so commonly know fact to the west, South Africa has become a leader in the world of house music, and with its vibrant atmosphere and passionate fans it's no wonder why the success of this song on its release was only a precursor to the way it still resonates today and continues to influence multiple genres.


It shows us music is a powerful tool that can be used to raise awareness for causes that lack public support and to promote culture. This track serves as an example of how music and video can band together to send out a positive message about fairness and justice in society.


Keep enjoying music, purchase tunes when you can, and if you are creating it, strive to make an impact. And remember, not using tits and ass while keeping your clothes on will never be out of style, and still sell just as many units, keep your eye on the prize , not the titts.


Have a listen, and please don’t forget to like and share our channels if it resonates within you and your space.


Anthony Donnelly

May Good JuJu Find You








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